North America
Europe
Denmark
France
Germany
Italy
Netherlands
Poland
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
U.K.
Latin America
Asia Pacific
Argentina
Brazil
Mexico
Australia
China
Hong Kong
India
Japan
Korea
New Zealand
UL的第三年度全球范围内的产品意识研究比以往更加广泛和深入,旨在一个更广泛的产品领域内了解制造商和消费者关注和优先考虑的重点。

更多资讯 >
UL乐于分享引以为傲的“新科学”,它通过在基础科学、测试方法、软件及标准方面一系列的研究开发,展示了UL致力于创建一个更加安全的世界的承诺。

更多资讯 >

标准

每年有数千种产品及其零部件按我们的严格要求接受测试。

仪表板

UL仪表板上的各种工具比以往更灵巧、更有效、更快捷,可使企业满足日益变迁的市场需要。

了解更多 >

资料库

标志中心

服务

标准

Share

Storms can destroy more than buildings; learn safety tips and save lives

2011 was the most disastrous year according to the Centre for Research on Epidemiology of Disaster.  In fact, there were ninety-nine "major natural disasters" declared in the U.S. last year, breaking the previous record of eighty-one set in 2010.

Knowing what to do during an emergency is an important part of being prepared and may make all the difference when seconds count. UL (Underwriters Laboratories), a global safety science company, offers insights on how to prepare and implement a disaster preparedness plan.

Preparing for the Unexpected

  • Make sure children can spell their name, parents' names and know their phone number and address
  • Prepare an emergency kit and include five days' worth of non-perishable food and water, a can opener, flashlight, portable emergency radio (hand-crank, solar-powered or battery-operated), batteries, any prescription medication needed by family members, a first aid kit, list of phone numbers for relatives, neighbors and utility companies, and pictures and descriptions of your family.
  • Don't forget about the pets: Include five days' worth of canned pet food and water, sturdy leashes, harnesses or carriers, current photos and descriptions and a litter box

Stay Connected

  • Identify your family's ‘in case of emergency' (ICE) contact and ensure children have the appropriate contact information should an emergency occur
  • Identify an emergency meeting place for your family in case you get separated

Post-Disaster - Don't Take Safety for Granted

  • Stay clear of downed wires and power lines and be extremely cautious of floodwater, which is likely to be contaminated
  • Keep generators outside in a well-ventilated, dry area, away from the home; as a potential post-storm danger is carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, especially if generators are being used as an alternative source of electricity

We may not know when Mother Nature is planning to visit, but can be prepared for her arrival, by adhering to the above safety guidelines. For additional information on disaster preparedness plans, as well as to learn more about a host of other family and home safety topics, please visit http://www.safetyathome.com/.

 

*Source: Centre for Research on Epidemiology of Disaster's International Database